[ Reading ] ➺ How to Kill a City Author Peter Moskowitz – Fastfood-point-of-sale-2018.info

How to Kill a City Peter Moskowitz s volume details the ways that city governments and federal policies have an equal hand in gentrification as city immigrants looking for cheap rents I admired his combination of personal stories from gentrifiers and gentrified citizens alongside historical analysis and in This country was founded on displacement on the idea that white men have a greater right to space, and even to people s bodies, than anyone else That s taken the form of slavery, segregation, the genocide of Native Americans, and now, to a certain extent, gentrification I m guessing that most players in gentrification the victims and the gentrifiers are unaware of the systems and political acts underlying what we all can see are the effects of gentrification While Moskowitz acknowledge This country was founded on displacement on the idea t The Term Gentrification Has Become A Buzzword To Describe The Changes In Urban Neighborhoods Across The Country, But We Don T Realize Just How Threatening It Is It Means Than The Arrival Of Trendy Shops, Much Maligned Hipsters, And Expensive Lattes The Very Future Of American Cities As Vibrant, Equitable Spaces Hangs In The Balance.Peter Moskowitz S How To Kill A City Takes Readers From The Kitchen Tables Of Hurting Families Who Can No Longer Afford Their Homes To The Corporate Boardrooms And Political Backrooms Where Destructive Housing Policies Are Devised Along The Way, Moskowitz Uncovers The Massive, Systemic Forces Behind Gentrification In New Orleans, Detroit, San Francisco, And New York The Deceptively Simple Question Of Who Can And Cannot Afford To Pay The Rent Goes To The Heart Of America S Crises Of Race And Inequality In The Fight For Economic Opportunity And Racial Justice, Nothing Could Be Important Than Housing.A Vigorous, Hard Hitting Expose, How To Kill A City Reveals Who Holds Power In Our Cities And How We Can Get It Back This book is so compelling all of the complexities and facts and policies are there, but intersperse with the stories of living, breathing people who are being displaced I have read a fair amount on gentrification, and this is the book I would put in people s hands. Written from the perspective of a native New Yorker and self identified gentrifier, How To Kill a City explores the phenomenon through 4 unique case studies New York City, New Orleans, Detroit and San Francisco I appreciate the broader audience this serves and The minute my friend Jason told me about How to Kill a City I was on it like a duck on a June bug The book takes a look at four major cities in the US that have been thoroughly or partially transformed through gentrification over recent years New Orleans, Detroit, San Francisco, New York I have ties to three of the four I spent the first seventeen years of my life in Detroit, lived in New York City in the late 90 s for four years, and have had family and friends living in San Francisco The minute my friend Jason told me about How to Kill a City I was on it like a duck on a June bug The book takes a look at four major cities in the US that have been thoroughly or partially transformed through gentrification over recent years New Orleans, Detroit, San Francisco, New York I have ties to three of the four I spent the first seventeen years of my life in Detroit, lived in New York City in the late 90 s for four years, and have had family and friends living in San Francisco since the 80 s So I ve seen a lot of the changes Moskowitz describes up close and personal actually read the section on Detroit while visiting Detroit last week I think the book is stron This was a wonderful, comprehensive look at the cycle of gentrification across four different cities Moskowitz s writing is compelling, casual, and very well researched all at the same time, which I really appreciated I learned a lot about one of the most divisive subjects today, and appreciated the anecdotal tidbits interviews mixed with harder research history That said, this book, for all its historical underpinnings, rarely focuses on things like crime rates and murder rates i This was a wonderful, comprehensive look at the cycle of gentrification across four different cities Moskowitz s writing is compelling, casual, and very well researched all at the same time, which I really appreciated I learned a lot about one of the most divisive subjects today, and appreciated the anecdotal tidbits interviews mixed with harder research history That said, this book, for all its historical underpinnings, rarely focuses on things like crime rates and murder rates in the era before gentrification While the problems of New Orleans or Detroit are alluded to, gentrification is only seen as the enemy It can be a grating perspective when you remember that New Orleans, Detroit, and New York City have all grappled with these problems and, many times, crime rates get lower as areas become gentrified In that case I really appreciated Moskowitz s book, and I think it s a significant contribution to mainstream books currently available on the topic of gentrification How to Kill a City is probably the most direct, wide reaching, and accessible work I ve read on the topic I intentionally read it immediately after Rothstein s heavy academic tome, The Color of Law, not to compare but as a complementary piece Moskowitz s book is heavily researched both in terms of supportive scholarship and life experience, I really appreciated Moskowitz s book, and I think it s a significant contribution to mainstream books currently available on the topic of gentrification How to Kill a City is probably the most direct, wide The ignorance of the lives of others is allows gentrification to happen Sharifa Rhodes Pitts points out in her book Harlem is Nowhere that whenever a neighborhood gentrifies, you hear white people and the media using phrases such as People are starting to move to that neighborhood, or No one used to go there, but that s changing The implication is that before these places gentrified, no one lived there, or at least no one of importance This is what is happening in New Orleans and every o The ignorance of the lives of others is allows gentrification to happen Sharifa Rhodes Pitts points out in her book Harlem is Nowhere that whenever a neighborhood gentrifies, you hear white people and the media using phrases such as People are starting to move to that neighborhood, or No one used to go there, but that s changing The implication is that before these places gentrified, no one lived there, or at least no one of importance This is what is happening in New Orleans and every other gentrifying city If you ignore the destruction of the lives of the people who s always mattered the least, things are going great If you acknowledge that their lives exist and that they matter, then it becomes immediately obvious something is terribly wrong So what does it mean that we are not only ignoring these people b I should have known when the San Francisco Chronicle recommended this book that it was going to be far left As a 60 year resident of one of the cities discussed in this book, I found several crucial trends missing from this book 1 The author focuses on certain races getting displaced and not on economic groups Are races being targeted, or is the middle class being targeted too 2 There is virtually no mention of EB 5 visas that allow rich people from other countries to jum


About the Author: Peter Moskowitz

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the How to Kill a City book, this is one of the most wanted Peter Moskowitz author readers around the world.


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